Indigenous Mapping Network at UC Berkeley Sept Mtg Summary

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Latest

Last Updated on Thursday, 17 September 2009 21:25

September meeting of the Indigenous Mapping Network at UC Berkeley: Tammie Grant shares her experiences working with tribal colleges and geospatial technologies.

Tammie Grant demos Google Earth science and tek project

More pictures of event on Flickr

It's the beginning of the new semester at Berkeley and we had a nice turnout this evening. In attendance were some graduate students in Anthropology (specifically, archeology) and in Environmental Science, Policy, and Management (ESPM), including some first year grads in the latter program as well as some old-timers, and an undergrad from the Native American Studies program here to report back on our meeting to her program's newsletter.

The presentation:

Tammie Grant returns to the Berkeley IMN chapter tonight to show us some of her experiences in working with the Salish Kootenai College in Montana as a tribal college geospatial outreach consultant. She began by reviewing some tribal college history, emphasizing the need for more workforce development on reservations, including specifically jobs in civil engineering, nursing, teaching, natural resource management, and business administration. Though the tribes have sovereignty, they often have poor economic development due to several factors, including isolation, lack of capital, shortage of skilled workers, and the short political cycle of tribal government. Many of the teachers at the college and many of the people doing remote sensing or GIS work are often white; a good goal is to train tribal workers in these jobs and to retain them in the community.

Tammie then illustrated a variety of outreach projects, including student internships at federal agencies such as NASA and USGS, and several examples of student projects sampling water quality on a reservation and using MODIS satellite data to detect fires. She emphasized the importance of involving the teachers at the college in these projects to foster student-teacher relationships and to allow the skills and information to integrate more effectively into the community.

The centerpiece of Tammie's presentation was her nearly completed work in integrating geological Western teaching with oral tradition storytelling from elders. In particular in the Flathead Lake area, there is a rich geological history of folding, faulting, and glacial activity which has been well-studied by the University of Montana, and there is a parallel, rich oral history of the area in both the Salish and Kootenai traditions. The project involved teaching the two side-by-side, with the geologist and the elder taking turns telling the stories of the landscape. The products generated by this project are a DVD of stories told by the elders, a teacher's reference guide containing some of the same information, a Google Earth project showing the sites, stories, and photos, field trips with middle school students and elders, and teacher workshops for this material as well as for ArcGIS.

The discussion:

After a demonstration of some of these products, a lively discussion followed on the issues surrounding the recording of oral history and the social issues that can potentially surround teaching on reservations. Tammie reports that all of the students mentioned above have continued to use geospatial technologies, either on the reservation, at the tribal college, or have gone on to grad school at University of Montana. One attendee from archeology had just completed an educational module for a group in the Southwest, and related parallel concerns about the adoption of new curricula. Another attendee from ESPM related her experiences with Arctic tribes in Canada, where the concerns are social before educational. She cited the importance of getting the kids on the land both to address social and behavioral issues as well as being culturally appropriate. Also discussed was the issue of respectfully using the elders' time, and the organic way in which native storytelling often unfolds – perhaps not resulting in the stories that were originally desired, or at least not immediately. One of the managers of the Geospatial Innovation Facility here at Berkeley related how colleagues of his at the American Natural History Museum have developed tools for including stories and photos in Quantum GIS, an open-source GIS product.  The discussions in general seemed fruitful as people from different areas compared notes and learned from others' experiences.

Melissa V. Eitzel

Melissa V. Eitzel, PhD Student, UC Berkeley, Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management



 

Circle of Purpose: Wind of the Wings of the Kundur Anka

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Latest

Last Updated on Tuesday, 08 September 2009 13:42

NAHUACALLI

Embassy of the Indigenous Peoples

Wind of the Wings of the Kundur Anka

20th Anniversary of the First Continental Encounter of Indigenous Peoples

June 14-16, 2010 in Quito, Ecuador

Circle of Purpose

   

ArcGIS Explorer 900

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Latest

Last Updated on Monday, 17 August 2009 10:07

The ArcGIS Explorer 900 (AGX 900) release is an vast improvement over the prior explorer releases and is now, in my opinion, the ultimate ArcGIS Server / ArcGIS Online client.   In addition to being able to display a wide array of local, and online data formats you can include non-georeferenced images as slides as you would in a PowerPoint presentation.  The slides store descriptive text, spatial extent and visibility which you can then advance through in full screen mode.  This means you can seamlessly go from a ppt slide or photograph to the 3D globe were you can zoom in on your project and GIS data.  I’ve been working with AGX 900 for the past week and plan on using it exclusively as presentation tool rather than PowerPoint.  

With all of the free ArcGIS Online content and our own locally hosted ArcGIS Server Map Services coming online, AGX allows a much richer user experience than we can currently accomplish in a web browser.  AGX 900 can be easily customized to support ArcGIS Server “Tasks” which are published tools from ArcGIS Server which allow complex queries, searches and even geoprocessing events. AGX 900 is free and totally customizable through the published SDK.   Check it out!

ESRI ArcGIS Explorer Provided by D. Gadsden ESRI

Overview

http://www.esri.com/news/releases/09_3qtr/arcgis_explorer.html

Download:

http://www.esri.com/software/arcgis/explorer/index.html


<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><>
David Gadsden - NW Federal Account Manager
ESRI – Environmental Systems Research Institute
606 Columbia Street NW, Suite 300, Olympia WA
Phone: 360.754.4727 Fax: 360.943.6910
Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Web: www.esri.com
<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> <><><>

   

Secretary Chu Announces Funding for Clean Energy Projects on Tribal Lands and Alaska Villages

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Latest

Last Updated on Thursday, 13 August 2009 18:41

DOENEWS - OFFICE OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS
NEWS MEDIA CONTACTS: FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
 
202-586-4940
Thursday, August 13, 2009
 
   
Secretary Chu Announces Funding for Clean Energy Projects on Tribal Lands and Alaska Villages
 
Anchorage, Alaska - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced up to $13.6 million in multi-year funding for new clean energy projects on tribal lands.  Thirty-six Native American tribes and Alaska villages have been selected to receive awards that will advance renewable energy technologies and energy efficiency and conservation projects on tribal lands and rural Alaska villages. 
 
"The Department of Energy is committed to helping Native American tribes meet their energy needs through clean energy technologies," said Secretary Chu.  "These projects will create jobs and economic opportunities on tribal lands, while protecting our planet and reducing our dependence on foreign oil."
 
In Alaska, many rural Native villages face the special challenge of paying high retail fuel prices to meet basic survival needs.  Heating oil and diesel fuel is expensive, and the situation becomes even more burdensome for rural communities with the increased costs for transportation and storage.  For those Alaska Native communities and many other tribes struggling in the current economy, renewable energy and greater efficiency can provide reliable power supplies while reducing heating and electricity costs. 
 
DOE selected the projects through a competitive process and will provide financial assistance to the tribes for weatherization training, feasibility studies, and development and deployment of renewable energy and energy efficiency measures.  The DOE funding is expected to be matched by up to $27 million in public and private investment, for a total value of up to $41 million. 
 
Of the 36 Native American tribes and villages whose projects have been selected for negotiation, 8 projects will provide weatherization training and resources to tribal members, 17 projects will focus on assessing the feasibility of renewable energy development and energy efficiency deployment on tribal lands; and 11 projects will fund the development of renewable energy resources and the deployment of energy efficiency measures on tribal lands and villages.
 
Since 2002, the Department of Energy has provided $16.5 million for 93 tribal energy projects. 
 
For more on the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's Tribal Energy Program, visit www.eere.energy.gov/tribalenergy/
 
 
The following projects listed are selected for award negotiations.  DOE funding is subject to negotiation and annual congressional appropriations. 

(Indigenous Mapping Network Congratulates the Applicants!)



Applicant*
Application Type
Technology
State
Requested DOE Funds
Estimated Cost Share
Projected Project Cost
Renewable Energy Development and Deployment Projects
 
Campo Band of Mission Indians
Pre-Construction
Wind (160 MW)
CA
$1,255,574
$4,234,750
$5,490,324
 
Chaninik Wind Group
Building Efficiency
Wind (1.35 MW) and Thermal Heating
AK
$750,000
$1,250,000
$2,000,000
 
Cherokee Nation Business
Pre- Construction
Wind (127.5 MW)
OK
$990,500
$1,286,621
$2,277,121
 
Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians
Building Efficiency
Lighting, Building Envelop & HVAC
NC
$200,000
$200,000
$400,000
 
Forest County Potawatomi Community
Building Efficiency
Lighting
WI
$459,000
$459,000
$918,000
 
Forest County Potawatomi Community
Building Efficiency
Envelop, Heating & Cooling, Electrical and Plumbing
WI
$1,115,043
$1,115,043
$2,230,086
 
Haida Power, Inc.
Construction
Hydroelectric (5 MW)
AK
$1,120,000
$16,025,000
$17,145,000
 
Hualapai Tribe
Pre- Construction
Wind
AZ
$370,000
$185,000
$555,000
 
Kootznoowoo Incorporated
Pre- Construction
Hydroelectric (1 MW)
AK
$1,110,500
$1,110,500
$2,221,000
 
Rosebud Sioux Tribe
Pre- Construction
Wind (190 MW)
SD
$1,500,000
$1,500,000
$3,000,000
 
The Chickasaw Nation
Building Efficiency
Lighting
OK
$200,000
$100,000
$300,000
 
Feasibility Study Projects
 
Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians

Feasibility: Renewables
Solar
CA
$150,000
$38,102
$188,102
 
Chickaloon Native Village
Feasibility
EE & RE
AK
$244,106
$0
$244,106
 
Cook Inlet Tribal Council, Inc.
Feasibility: Efficiency
Bldg. Efficiency
AK
$57,184
$0
$57,184
 
Elk Valley Rancheria
Feasibility: Efficiency
Bldg. Efficiency, General Renewables, Geothermal, Wave, Wind, Solar
CA
$76,738
$6,755
$83,493
 
Fort Peck Assiniboine & Sioux Tribes
Feasibility: Renewables
Geothermal Electrical
MT
$233,170
$0
$233,170
 
Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma
Feasibility: Renewables
Wind
OK
$242,586
$15,751
$258,337
 
Keweenaw Bay Indian Community
Feasibility: Renewables
Wind
MI
$207,680
$15,000
$222,680
 
Lac Court Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians
Feasibility: Renewables
Hydro-power
WI
$201,643
$0
$201,643
 
Lower Sioux Indian Community
Feasibility: Renewables
Wind 
MN
$250,000
$100,290
$350,290
 
Lummi Indian Business Council (WIND)
Feasibility: Renewables
Wind
WA
$180,000
$0
$180,000
 
Native Village of Eyak
Feasibility: Renewables
Wind
AK
$248,107
$29,440
$277,547
 
Pinoleville Pomo Nation
Feasibility: Renewables
MicroHydro; Geothermal; Biomass; Wind; Solar
CA
$101,630
$4,860
$106,490
 
Sac & Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa
Feasibility: Renewables
Wind
IA
$246,770
$8,052
$254,822
 
Sault St. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians
Feasibility: Efficiency
Building Efficiency
MI
$95,000
$0
$95,000
 
To'Hajiilee Economic Development, Inc.
Feasibility: Renewables
Solar
NM
$250,000
$0
$250,000
 
Upper Skagit Indian Tribe
Feasibility: Renewables
Wind
WA
$140,000 
$0
$140,000
 
Washoe Tribe of Nevada and California
Feasibility: Renewables
Solar, Wind, Geothermal, Biomass & Biofuels
NV
$249,827
$0
$249,827
 
Weatherization Training
 
Aleutian Pribilof Islands Association
Weatherization Training
Weatherization Conservation Program
AK
$200,000
$0
$200,000
 
Bishop Paiute Tribe
Weatherization Training
Weatherization Training Program
CA
$139,352
$0
$139,352
 
Central Council of Tlingit & Haida Indians
Weatherization Training
Alaska Native Weatherization Training & Jobs Project
AK
$200,000
$115,871
$315,871
 
Cook Inlet Tribal Council, Inc.
Weatherization Training
Weatherization Apprenticeships
AK
$194,454
$18,660
$213,114
 
Keweenaw Bay Indian Community
Weatherization Training
Weatherization Training Project
MI
$137,640
$0
$137,640
 
Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians
Weatherization Training
Weatherization Center
WI
$143,717
$0
$143,717
 
Peoria Tribe - Housing Authority of the Peoria Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma
Weatherization Training
PHA Weatherization Training Project
OK
$105,620
$0
$105,620

Scotts Valley Band of Pomo Indians
Weatherization Training
Multi-County Weatherization Program
CA
$240,200
$0
$240,200
 
* Listed in alphabetical order
   

Page 6 of 16